STUDY ALERT: Lower Cognitive Ability Predicts Greater Prejudice Through Right-Wing Ideology and Low Intergroup Contact

by Scott Barry Kaufman, February 2, 2012 in Study Alerts

Bright Minds and Dark Attitudes: Lower Cognitive Ability Predicts Greater Prejudice Through Right-Wing Ideology and Low Intergroup Contact Gordon Hodson and Michael A. Busseri Abstract Despite their important implications for interpersonal behaviors and relations, cognitive abilities have been largely ignored as explanations of prejudice. We proposed and tested mediation models in which lower cognitive ability […]

The Need to Believe in the Ability of Disability

by Scott Barry Kaufman, January 30, 2012 in Blog

[This article was co-authored with Kevin McGrew]

Our society has clear expectations regarding students who don’t fit the norm. In a 2004 national survey reported in Education Week, 84% of 800 surveyed special and general education teachers did not believe that students in special education should be expected to meet the same set of academic standards articulated for students without disabilities. These beliefs are important, as they guide policies that either encourage or hinder students with disabilities from receiving the same opportunities to flourish as everyone else. Read More

STUDY ALERT: I like who you like, but only if I like you: Female character affects mate-choice copying

by Scott Barry Kaufman, January 27, 2012 in Study Alerts

I like who you like, but only if I like you: Female character affects mate-choice copying

Simon Chu

Mate-choice copying is shown when women imitate the mate-choice preferences of other women. Read More

STUDY ALERT: The Mere Anticipation of an Interaction with a Woman Can Impair Men’s Cognitive Performance

by Scott Barry Kaufman, January 22, 2012 in Study Alerts

The Mere Anticipation of an Interaction with a Woman Can Impair Men’s Cognitive Performance

Sanne Nauts • Martin Metzmacher • Thijs Verwijmeren • Vera Rommeswinkel • Johan C. Karremans

Abstract

Recent research suggests that heterosexual men’s (but not heterosexual women’s) cognitive performance is impaired after an interaction with someone of the opposite sex (Karremans et al., 2009). Read More

STUDY ALERT: The Association between Resting Functional Connectivity and Creativity

by Scott Barry Kaufman, January 17, 2012 in Study Alerts

Title: The Association between Resting Functional Connectivity and Creativity

Authors: Hikaru Takeuchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Hiroshi Hashizume, Yuko Sassa, Tomomi Nagase, Rui Nouchi and Ryuta Kawashima

Abstract

The analysis of functional connectivity at rest (rFC) enables us to know how brain regions within and between networks interact. In this study, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and a creativity test of divergent thinking (DT) to investigate the relationship between creativity measured by DT and rFC. Read More

STUDY ALERT: What No Child Left Behind Leaves Behind + Bonus

by Scott Barry Kaufman, January 12, 2012 in Study Alerts

TITLE: What No Child Left Behind Leaves Behind: The Roles of IQ and Self-Control in Predicting Standardized Achievement Test Scores and Report Card Grades

AUTHORS: Angela L. Duckworth, Patrick D. Quinn, Eli Tsukayama

ABSTRACT

The increasing prominence of standardized testing to assess student learning motivated the current investigation. We propose that standardized achievement test scores assess competencies determined more by intelligence than by self-control, whereas report card grades assess competencies determined more by self-control than by intelligence. Read More

STUDY ALERT: Role of test motivation in intelligence testing

by Scott Barry Kaufman, January 11, 2012 in Study Alerts

TITLE: Role of test motivation in intelligence testing

AUTHORS: Angela Lee Duckwortha,1, Patrick D. Quinnb, Donald R. Lynamc, Rolf Loeberd, and Magda Stouthamer-Loeberd

ABSTRACT

Intelligence tests are widely assumed to measure maximal intellectual performance, and predictive associations between intelligence quotient (IQ) scores and later-life outcomes are typically interpreted as unbiased estimates of the effect of intellectual ability on academic, professional, and social life outcomes. The current investigation critically examines these assumptions and finds evidence against both. Read More

STUDY ALERT: How Smart Do You Think You Are?

by Scott Barry Kaufman, January 10, 2012 in Study Alerts

TITLE: How Smart Do You Think You Are? A Meta-Analysis on the Validity of Self-Estimates of Cognitive Ability

AUTHORS: Philipp Alexander Freund and Nadine Kasten

ABSTRACT

Individuals’ perceptions of their own level of cognitive ability are expressed through self-estimates. They play an important role in a person’s self-concept because they facilitate an understanding of how one’s own abilities relate to those of others. People evaluate their own and other persons’ abilities all the time, but self-estimates are also used in formal settings, such as, for instance, career counseling. Read More

STUDY ALERT: Training the Brain: Practical Applications of Neural Plasticity

by Scott Barry Kaufman, January 9, 2012 in Study Alerts

Title: Practical Applications of Neural Plasticity From the Intersection of Cognitive Neuroscience, Developmental Psychology, and Prevention Science

Author: Richard L. Bryck and Philip A. Fisher

Abstract

Prior researchers have shown that the brain has a remarkable ability for adapting to environmental changes. The positive effects of such neural plasticity include enhanced functioning in specific cognitive domains and shifts in cortical representation following naturally occurring cases of sensory deprivation; however, maladaptive changes in brain function and development owing to early developmental adversity and stress have also been well documented. Researchers examining enriched rearing environments in animals have revealed the potential for inducing positive brain plasticity effects and have helped to popularize methods for training the brain to reverse early brain deficits or to boost normal cognitive functioning. Read More

STUDY ALERT: High-Stakes Testing: Does It Increase Achievement?

by Scott Barry Kaufman, in Study Alerts

TITLE: High-Stakes Testing: Does It Increase Achievement?

AUTHOR: Sharon L. Nichols

ABSTRACT

I review the literature on the impact on student achievement of high-stakes testing. Its popularity as a mechanism for holding educators accountable has triggered studies to examine whether its promise to increase student learning has been fulfilled. The review concludes there is no consistent evidence to suggest high-stakes testing leads to increases in student learning*. Read More

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